World is Sudden: Part II

Giles Bailey & CIRCA Projects, Simon Bayliss & Susie Green, Kathryn Elkin, Dane Law, Sarah Kenchington, Mia La Metta, Cheryl Donegan, Aïda Ruilova

14 October 2016

14 October 2016

00.00-02.30 (Starts at Midnight)

  • The Old Policehouse, Swinburne Place, Gateshead
  • Tickets £6 / £4 Concessions (FREE with a TUSK Festival Pass)

Archival Material
Giles Bailey & CIRCA Projects 2016–18 24 September 2016 – 1 July 2018 Giles Bailey & CIRCA Projects (2016–18) World is Sudden: Part II (Video Documentation) 14 October 2016 Giles Bailey & CIRCA Projects (2016–18)

Inspired by the collateral, incompatible and sudden world described in Louis MacNiece’s 1935 poem Snow, each World is Sudden event brings together a breadth of live practice, spanning performance, music and sound alongside disparate moving image works, internet video phenomena and archival material. Staged in a specially designed set the works included will be presented as a continuous sequential flow resisting the tyranny of prescribed thematics and embracing “the drunkenness of things being various”.

Performances

Giles Bailey: Since 2000 Giles Bailey participated in Leeds and Glasgow’s music scenes as part of the collective Nuts & Seeds and the bands Kill Yourself, Triple School, The One Ensemble Orchestra and Dananananakroyd. Bailey will perform a set of new songs with a sampler and vocals.

Susie Green & Simon Bayliss: Live performance by artist/musicians Susie Green & Simon Bayliss. Green leaks moments of intimacy, propositioning you. Her smooth and commanding vocals flow into undulating swells of 808 synth-bass played by Simon Bayliss.

Mia La Metta: Solo project by Kathy Gray (Beards) veers away from jagged post-punk taunts, instead Mia La Metta thrives off drum machines, keyboard and minimal guitar. Kathy’s vocals still make fun, “ah-haha” over layered harmonies.

Sarah Kenchington: Kenchington builds outlandish instruments at her home in the hills north of Glasgow. Made out of leftover pipes and mechanical scraps, refashioned and colour coded. Designed to be played by anyone, when played by Kenchington it is simultaneously a demonstration and invitation to the audience.

Dane Law: Danelaw is a historical name given to the part of England in which the laws of the Danes held sway and dominated those of the Anglo-Saxons. Danelaw contrasts West Saxon law and Mercian law. This is the music of Dane Law — a software patch and current alias of producer and engineer Adam Parkinson.

Videos

Cheryl Donegan, Head (1993): With Head, Cheryl Donegan ushered in a new era of brash, low-tech performance video. Here she confronts sex, fantasy, and voyeurism in an autoerotic work-out performed to pop music. In this image of sexual “pleasure” and fantasy, Donegan is both subject and object, directing the action and performing for the camera without acknowledging its presence.

Kathryn Elkin, Your Voice (2016): Your Voice is a proto pop video centred on Those Were the Days, a Russian song which became popular in the west after Paul McCartney produced an English-language version with Mary Hopkin. This 1968 hit was accompanied by a studio video prior to the era of music videos. Elkin’s interest lies in the act of miming in pop recordings and questions what it mean to be a woman performing voiceless in this context.

Aïda Ruilova, You’re Pretty / Beat & Perv / Oh No (All 1999): Most of Ruilova’s earlier videos are less than a minute long. Like haiku, they aren’t narrative, but they concisely illuminate a situation. Shots of lone young women or men gesturing obsessively or keening idiosyncratic sounds or words in corridors, basements, stairs, or cellars are broken down into short sequences of a second or less.

Set Design

Eleanor Wright: Developed as a mutable setting for the series of events programmed by Giles Bailey & CIRCA Projects, Catcher Pressure Pusher takes the choreographed space that we negotiate every single day as a starting point. Very much positioned within the larger programme of live events, the installation itself consists of a number of over-sized and human-scale architectural sculptures. Assembled from theatrical rigging and cut pieces of felt, the work moderates the relationships within the space which, as such, dissolves distinctions between stage, set, performers and audience and is instead conceived as one shared space.

The sculptural choreography reacts to the particularities of each space within the programme and what the performers and viewers bring with them each night. It is animated through the participation of people. Within this arena, the installation generates spaces and situations that allude to both theatrical and architectural sceneries while remaining essentially abstract. During the events the sculptures can be accessed and used by everyone in the room for example as a protective screen, a meeting point, an obstacle or a support structure, to name a few. Catcher Pressure Pusher distributes the attention across the room conjugating a variety of parallel aesthetic experiences rather than pointing towards a singular centre of attention.

Image: Cheryl Donegan, Head (1993, 3mins). Courtesy of the Artist and Electronic Arts Intermix.

 

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14 October 2016

00.00-02.30 (Starts at Midnight)

  • The Old Policehouse, Swinburne Place, Gateshead
  • Tickets £6 / £4 Concessions (FREE with a TUSK Festival Pass)

Archival Material
Giles Bailey & CIRCA Projects 2016–18 24 September 2016 – 1 July 2018 Giles Bailey & CIRCA Projects (2016–18) World is Sudden: Part II (Video Documentation) 14 October 2016 Giles Bailey & CIRCA Projects (2016–18)